Preggo Secrets at Sonya’s Garden…

image
Beauty & I
image
The cottages at Sonya’s garden
image
Passion Fruit
image
The fresh leaves garden served as starters.
image
The Proposal dining area
Nicci and Sonya of Sonya's Garden
Nicci and Sonya of Sonya’s Garden
Myself , Sonya and Fely
Myself , Sonya and Fely

Drove to Sonya’s Garden on a beautiful Sunday. I have been there a few times already, definitely one of my favorite serenity places in the Philippines. Not only do they have clean and organic foods, the fresh air and beautiful flowers/plants create a comfort from the hustle and bustle of the city. We had the treat of meeting Sonya for the first time. She was so kind and toured us around her beautiful garden. Finding out I was expecting she advised me to not part take their Tarragon tea because it was not advisable.

image
Tarragon leaves in hot water. Served with their famous Chocolate cake.

Wow shocking because it was so soothing and smelled so good. Did you know that? This is my third pregnancy and this the first time I heard about this. I guess you learn something new everyday, Thank you Ms Sonya for letting me know.

So, I did more research about Herbs and found these useful information. Hope it helps everyone be aware especially my fellow expectant Mommies.

Herbs to completely avoid during pregnancy:

Herb Reason to avoid
Aloe Vera The leaves are strongly purgative and should not be taken internally.
Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis) A uterine and menstrual stimulant that could damage the fetus.
Autumn crocus (Colichicum autumnale) Can affect cell division and lead to birth defects.
Barberry (Berberis vulgaris) Contains high levels of berberine, known to stimulate uterine contractions.
Basil oil A uterine stimulant; use only during labour.
Beth root (Trillium erectum) A uterine stimulant; use only during labour.
Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosus) May lead to premature contractions; avoid unless under professional guidance. Safe to use during childbirth.
Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) A uterine stimulant that in quite small doses also causes vomiting.
Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) A uterine stimulant to avoid unless under professional guidance. Safe to use during childbirth.
Broom (Cytisus scoparius) Causes uterine contractions so should be avoided during pregnancy; in parts of Europe it is given after the birth to prevent blood loss.
Bugleweed (Lycopus virginicus) Interferes with hormone production in the pituitary gland, so best avoided.
Clove oil A uterine stimulant used only during labour.
Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) Contains toxic chemicals that will cross the placenta; do not take internally.
Cotton root (Gossypium herbaceum) Uterine stimulant traditionally given to encourage contractions during a difficult labour, but rarely used medicinally today.
Devil’s claw (Harpagophytum procumbens) Uterine stimulant, oxytocic.
Dong quai (Angelica polymorpha var. sinensis) Uterine and menstrual stimulant, best avoided during pregnancy; ideal after childbirth.
False unicorn root (Chamaelirium luteum) A hormonal stimulant to avoid unless under professional guidance.
Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) Uterine stimulant; may cause premature contractions.
Golden seal (Hydrastis canadensis) Uterine stimulant; may lead to premature contractions but safe during childbirth.
Greater celandine (Chelidonium majus) Uterine stimulant; may cause premature contractions.
Juniper and juniper oil (Juniperus communis) A uterine stimulant; use only during labour.
Lady’s mantle (Alchemilla xanthoclora) A uterine stimulant; use only in labour.
Liferoot (Senecio aureus) A uterine stimulant containing toxic chemicals that will cross the placenta.
Mistletoe (Viscum album) A uterine stimulant containing toxic chemicals that may cross the placenta.
Mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects; avoid unless under professional guidance. Also avoid when breastfeeding.
American pennyroyal (Hedeoma pulegioides) Reputed uterine stimulant to be avoided during pregnancy.
European pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects; avoid unless under professional guidance. Also avoid when breastfeeding.
Peruvian bark (Cinchona officinalis) Toxic; excess may cause blindness and coma. Used to treat malaria and given during pregnancy only to malaria sufferers under professional guidance.
Pokeroot (Phytolacca decandra) May cause birth defects.
Pseudoginseng (Panax notoginseng) May cause birth defects.
Pulsatilla (Anemone pulsatilla) Menstrual stimulant best avoided during pregnancy; limited use during lactation.
Rue (Ruta graveolens) Uterine and menstrual stimulant; may cause premature contractions.
Sassafras (Sassafras albidum) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects.
Shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) A uterine stimulant; use only during labour.
Southernwood (Artemisia abrotanum) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects; avoid unless under professional guidance. Also avoid when breastfeeding.
Squill (Urginea maritima) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects.
Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects.
Wild yam (Diascorea villosa) A uterine stimulant to avoid unless under professional guidance; safe during labour.
Wormwood (Artemisia absinthum) A uterine stimulant that may also cause birth defects; avoid unless under professional guidance. Also avoid when breastfeeding.

On the other hand here are some healthy Herbs I researched on that are safe during pregnancy (in moderation of course) –

Herb Reason for caution
Alder buckthorn (Rhamnus frangula) Strongly purgative, so should not be taken in high doses or for long periods.
Angelica (Angelica archangelica) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb.
Anise and aniseed oil (Pimpinella anisum) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb; avoid using the oil entirely.
Bitter orange (Citrus aurantiam) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb or in moderate use.
Caraway (Carum carvi) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb.
Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana) Strongly purgative, so should not be taken in high doses or for long periods.
Celery seed and oil (Apium graveolens) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb.
Chamomile oil The oil is a potent uterine stimulant to be avoided, but the dried or fresh herb is safe in moderation.
Chili (Capsicum spp) Avoid high doses as they may lead to heartburn; can flavor breast milk when breast-feeding. Moderate culinary use is fine.
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb; avoid the essential oil completely.
Cowslip (Primula veris) Strongly purgative and a uterine stimulant in high doses.
Elder bark Strongly purgative, so should not be taken in high doses or for long periods.
Fennel and fennel oil A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb; avoid using the oil entirely.
Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb or during labour.
Garlic (Allium sativa) Avoid high doses as they may lead to heartburn; can flavor breast milk when breastfeeding. Moderate culinary use is fine.
Gotu kola (Centella asiatica) Possible uterine stimulant; use in moderation for occasional teas only.
Jasmine oil A uterine stimulant best reserved for childbirth to ease labour.
Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng) Clinical reports suggest that high doses in pregnancy can lead to androgynous babies (caused by overstimulation of male sex hormones); use for short periods only.
Lavender (Lavendula argustifolia) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb or for moderate use.
Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) High doses can exacerbate high blood pressure; safe in moderation.
Lovage (Levisticum officinale) A uterine stimulant traditionally used in slow and difficult labour; safe as a culinary herb.
Marjoram and marjoram oil (Origanum vulgare) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb; avoid using the oil entirely.
Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca) A uterine stimulant in high doses; best limited to the final weeks and during labour.
Myrrh (Commiphora molmol) A uterine stimulant that may lead to premature contractions; avoid high doses.
Nutmeg and Nutmeg Oil Inhibits prostaglandin production and contains hallucinogens that may affect the fetus; once erroneously regarded as an abortifacient. Safe in normal culinary use.
Oregano (Origanum X marjoricum; O. onites) A uterine stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb; avoid using the oil entirely.
Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) Uterine stimulant that may also irritate the fetus in high doses; safe in normal culinary use.
Passion flower (Passiflora incarnata) A uterine stimulant in high doses; safe for moderate use.
Peppermint oil A uterine stimulant; avoid the oil entirely, although low doses of the dried herb can be used.
Raspberry leaf (Rubus idaeus) A uterine stimulant in high doses; best limited to the final six to eight weeks and during labour.
Rhubarb root (Rheum palmatum) Strongly purgative, so should not be taken in high doses or for long periods.
Rosemary and rosemary oil A uterine stimulant in high doses; safe in moderation and normal culinary use. Avoid using the oil entirely.
Saffron (Crocus sativa) A uterine stimulant in high doses; safe in normal culinary use.
Sage and sage oil A uterine and hormonal stimulant in high doses, but quite safe as a culinary herb; avoid using the oil entirely.
Senna (Senna alexandrina) Strongly purgative, so should not be taken in high doses or for long periods.
Tea, black (Camellia sinensis) Limit to two cups a day, as excess can lead to palpitations and increased heart rate.
Thyme oil (Thymus vulgaris) Some reports claim that it acts as a uterine stimulant, though the research is disputed; the herb is quite safe in cooking.
Vervain (Verbene officinalis) A uterine stimulant in high doses; best limited to the final weeks and during labour.
White horehound (Marrubium vulgare) Reputed uterine stimulant; safe in moderation in cough drops.
Wood betony (Stachys officinalis) A uterine stimulant in high doses; best limited to the final weeks and during labour.
Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) A uterine stimulant in high doses; best limited to the final weeks and during labour.

 mY PERSONAL FAVS……

  • Red Raspberry Leaf – Rich in iron, this herb has helped tone the uterus, increase milk production, decrease nausea, and ease labor pains. Some studies have even reported that using red raspberry leaf during pregnancy can reduce complications and the use of interventions during birth. You may see pregnancy teas that are made from red raspberry leaf to help promote uterine health during pregnancy. There is some controversy about whether this should be used throughout pregnancy or just in the second and third trimester, so many health care providers remain cautious and only recommend using it after the first trimester.
  • Peppermint Leaf – Helpful in relieving nausea/morning sicknessand flatulence
  • Ginger root – Helps relieve nausea and vomiting
  • Slippery Elm Bar-  Used to help relieve nausea, heartburn, and vaginal irritations
  • Oats & Oat Straw – Rich in calcium and magnesium; helps relieve anxiety, restlessness, and irritated skin.

If you would like to share other important pregnant information. Please share them with me, leave a message below or email on teambelasco@gmail.com . I would be happy to pass on your secrets to our fellow Mommies.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s